Courses

ITA 1130 and 1131 (courses are offered fully online or on campus) are sequential courses for beginners and pre-requisites for the Italian Minor. They are aimed at teaching basic speaking, writing, reading and listening skills in the target language. The courses build upon the student's ability to speak, understand, read and write Italian at an elementary level. Concepts emphasized in the courses are pronouns (possessive, direct and indirect), impersonal construction, past tense and future tense of all regular and high-frequency irregular verbs. Customs and cultural insights are also presented.

ITA 1135 (Accelerated Italian I) is designed for students who have some prior knowledge of Italian (equivalent to one year of Italian in high school).Encourages rapid acquisition and prepares students for ITA1131. Prerequisite: Some prior knowledge of Italian(one year in high school Italian). Instructor permission required.

ITA 2200 (Italian intermediate) is a course aimed to aid in the further development of the students' language skills through an in-depth review of grammar and intensive listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities. The course will introduce essential grammar constructions and concentrate particularly on the following: Double pronouns, distinguish between different past tenses, present/past subjunctive, and conditional.

ITA 2240 (Italian intermediate Conversation) and ITA 3440 (Italian Advance Conversation) are sequential courses for students who have completed three terms of Italian and/or have a good command of the language. Grammar and syntax revision are alternated with presentations about modern Italian society, which become topics for essays and class discussions. In order to acquire the necessary knowledge of Italian grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary, students will be exposed to present-day Italy through the selection of specific Italian articles and essays. In order to address the students’ own writing skills, written compositions will also be required as an integral part of the course. The course will consolidate all essential grammatical constructions and concentrate particularly on the communication skills with special attention to listening, reading, and learning how to analyze the language and the culture.

ITA 2441 (Italian for Business) Designed for intermediate students of Italian who wish to further their linguistic knowledge in specific areas of business. Prerequisites: ITA 1130, ITA 1131, and ITA 2200 or permission of the instructor.

ITA 3392 (Italian Cinema 1945-1970) Studies the Italian Cinema from the end of the World War II (neorealism) until the early 70's (Comedy Italian Style). Prerequisites: ITA 3421, ITA 3403, ITA 3500 or permission of the instructor.

ITA 3420 (Review Grammar and Writing I) and ITA 3421 (Review Grammar and Writing II) are sequential courses for students who have completed three terms of Italian and/or have a good command of the language. Grammar and syntax revision are alternated with presentations about modern Italian society, which become topics for essays and class discussions. In order to acquire the necessary knowledge of Italian grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary, students will be exposed to present-day Italy through the selection of specific Italian articles and essays.

ITA 3500 (Italian Culture and Society) is for student who have completed three or more terms of Italian and/or have a good command of the language. The course gives students sociocultural knowledge and well-rounded understanding of the culture and society in Italy. Global Learning course.

ITA 3403 (Venetian Masks and the Commedia dell’Arte) is for students who have completed four or more terms of Italian and/or have a very good command of the language. The course will introduce the students to the history of the Italian theatre and the “Commedia dell’Arte”.

ITT 3503 (The Virtual Grand Tour of Italy) explores the literature, history, customs and traditions of some of the most popular cities in Italy through the readings of masterpieces of 19th century by comparing each work to Modern Italy.