Turkish

Turkish, the most widely spoken of the Turkic languages, is one of the critical languages identified by the US Department of State. It is primarily spoken in Turkey with a population of over 76 million. Seeing as Turkey is a bridge between Asia and Europe, Turkish is a vital language.It is also a gender free language with a predictable grammar with the help of various suffixes that makes it interesting and fun to study.

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TURKEY

Turkish language courses should be of great appeal to students interested in Middle East studies and, more generally, a career path in international relations.

In addition, students who take Turkish I and Turkish II will be able to fulfill their Foreign Language requirement for the College of Arts and Sciences and the Middle East and Central Asia Certificate. For more information on the Middle East and Central Asia Certificate please CLICK HERE.

To receive more information about Turkish classes please contact the Department of Modern Languages at (305) 348-2851.

To view the schedule of current semester course offerings please CLICK HERE.

Faculty and Instructors

Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistant, Aylin Ballıdağ

Courses

TUR 1130 Turkish I (5). First course of a two semester sequence which focuses on the acquisition of communicative language competence. Attention is paid to the functional use of the structures presented in class. Turkish language knowledge and skills are developed through varied learning activities and extensive exposure to high frequency spoken and written forms. The student will act as the main agent of her/his own learning with the instructor as the facilitator.

TUR 1131 Turkish II (5). Second course of a two semester sequence which focuses on the acquisition of communicative language competence. Attention is paid to the functional use of the structures presented in class where the students are the main agent of learning. Turkish language knowledge and skills are developed through varied learning activities and extensive exposure to high frequency spoken and written forms.